Category Archives: Artistic Midwife

Worthier Battles To Be Fought

If you have no stomach for being fodder for a King or dying on the battle field you can still be remembered on St Crispian’s Day. Form a word army, storm the feast day of St Crispin, make a stirring speech, or not, and be long remembered for the power of your words.

A Word Soldier

A Word Soldier

Like light moonbeams they quietly gather, stealthily creeping through the cast iron curtains.

Treading lightly, the whispered word patterns silently amass, emerging from within the lofty mansion of the gods.

The rebel army forms a vivid word picture.

Disciplined, they gather resolutely in the darkened, labyrinthine corridors of the psyche, forming sturdy battalions.

With banners raised, they prepare to march, ready to invade distant lands.

Graceful, curling, silky, smooth little words, skilfully pirouette,
performing acrobatic feats, leading the way with striking agility.

While taut, tense, cryptic vipers, having skillfully twisted themselves from within the invisible chains, Hephaistos so meticulously fashioned in his anvil, self-righteously form an indomitable rearguard.

United the word warriors stand erect, on the mountaintops, awaiting the bugle call. In unison they surge forward, gathering momentum as they ride into the valleys.

The word army, united, buoying each other, singing, marches in tight formation.

In rhythm, the armed force gathers momentum, vigorously occupying and outwitting the foreign, virgin, white unblemished soil of the New World.

by Heather Blakey 2005

Advertisements

A Myth To Live By

towerhill.jpg

When Lemuria perished by volcanic fires it left but scattered fragments to mark where once it spread. For us it will be enough to trace the Divine Wisdom from the beginnings…to carry on the teaching of the divine instructors.”

Gathered around a cradle, rocked beneath the shelter of the Himalayan peaks, the divine initiates, guardians of an ancient teaching, ancestral members of the divine sisterhood, gently prepare a girl baby for her earthly journey. This child is destined to protect the ancient teaching and bring it to humanity, wrapped in brown paper.

Silently, speaking only with actions, the sisterhood perform rituals, passed on by initiators before them, initiators whose strong hands carried the divine science safely through Lemurian fires and Atalantean floods.

A guardian, with long, luxuriant red hair, wrapped in a sapphire, brocade trimmed robe, steps forward and speaks.

“Lone Warrior Maiden. You must take this ancient teaching and go forth to a corner post of the old Lemuria, our homeland. The law we have given you will direct your life. All your actions must be in accordance with the law, which will in turn protect and preserve your destiny. You will be a member of an earth family, a citizen of the great universe, a part of the whole. You must not forget that you are a part of a circle and over time you will form a circle with other initiates who follow. They will gather with you in an eternal, spirit garden.”

Soft red light, like that emanating from a legendary Lemurian sunset bathes the crade and infuses the baby with a gentle warmth that will linger, fills her with a dynamic life force.

Quietly the Goddess lays down gifts beside the cradle.

There is a stylus, tablets, a loom and golden thread to weave, to hold for others to follow, a mirror carved with the words ‘to thine self be true’, a golden badge of honour to preserve dignity and last but not least, a treasure box to store the treasures of life.

Now to find the right womb…

From The Wintered Womb

Underneath the thrice ploughed, fertile, fallow field
Impregnated within a wintered, woven, womb
Of richly composted humus
I lay seeking sustenance, nourishment from
The oxygen filled wintered mist that
Drizzles, seeping, replenishing the amniotic fluids
That trickles through the membranous umbilical cord
Fertilizing, greening,
Ensuring a bountiful spring harvest.

Voices on the wind, drift through the chosen womb, throught the richly composted humus… a mother crying… she has three children already… how will she manage. Dr Salvaris reassures her. They will do a tubal ligation at the same time as this child is delivered, to ensure that her womb will lie fallow from this time on. What does this mean for me I wonder? ‘Prove your worth that’s what you will do….’ more words come filtering into the womb filling me with apprehension. Will I ever be good enough?

Heather Lorraine Blakey
born 27th August 1950
St David’s Hospital
Maffra, Victoria, Australia
daughter of Colin James Goodwin and
Dorothy Jean Goodwin

Born in the ward
giving precedence to
Graeme Chirpig who
tried to take
all the attention.

Born in time
for an extra slap
on the bottom
for so unceremoniously
disrupting Sister Cameron’s morning tea.

With a deft knot in her mother’s tubes
Dr Salvaris
ensured she would be
the last divinity to slip
unexpectedly
from her uterus

They said
the room filled with
radiant heated light
on that August morning
when she
triumpantly
entered the stage
looking radiant
brown eyes glowing
expectantly

It was perfectly evident
To all with eyes to see
And ears to hear
That this quaint child
Sheltered by the Great Dividing Range
Wore the mark of teacher
Emblazoned on her brow.

Her mother knew
That this child of her womb
Would be her last
that this child of Clotho and Laschesis
Was to be shielded from Atropos’s scissors

Her mother knew that this child was to be
Sheltered, protected, within the isolation of a remote outpost
That sacrifices had to be made to
Nurture, nourish and encourage her
To live out her carefully measured destiny.

Living a Fuller Life

Selene Goddess Knowledge CardsSelene, Queen of the Starlit Heavens, is an ancient Greek goddess the moon. She carries the moon across the sky in a white chariot driven by winged horses or bulls. She is the totality of the moon, with its waxing into fullness and waning into darkness. Selene represents the fullness of life, incorporating all the phases of light and dark in her shining.

While one has no control over how long he or she may live, caring for one’s body/soul/spirit, can be a contributing factor in a long life. Selene reminds us to consider some characteristics that contribute to a full life.

  • Good genes. No one has control over their birth, and who their parents are but caring for one’s body properly may help overcome genetic issues.
  • A goal or purpose in life. Time to re-read Victor Frankl’s Search for Meaning
  • Optimistic outlook on life.
  • Handling Stress. There are three basic problems that adversely affect the normal stress that we all have: fear, guilt, and moral conflicts. Stress is a part of life itself. It is not a matter of whether we have stress or not, for we all do, it is how do we handle it?
  • Good diet and health care.  It has been said that the majority of organic diseases in our hospitals have had a psychosomatic origin. The constant stress and strain of life, coupled with lack of proper bodily care, contributes eventually to a serious breakdown.

Selene sweeps into my life to remind me that the moon waxes into fullness and wanes into darkness. The time in darkness with Hel helps me to understand the contrasts.

Changing Woman

One of the primary characters of Navajo mythology and religion is Changing Woman who grows old and young again with the seasons. She represents the power of the earth and of women to create and sustain life. Other Holy Women stand at the four directions: in the East is Earth Woman, in the South is Mountain Woman, in the West is Water Woman, and in the North is Corn Woman.

The Changing Woman got Her name from Her ability to change along with the seasons. In the spring and summer, She appears as a young maiden full of life, vitality and, of course, fertility. In the fall and winter she transforms Herself into an old woman, representing the desolateness of age, infertility, and eventual death.

Changing Woman

Changing Woman is perhaps the most revered of deities among the Native Americans of the southwestern United States.

She is wholly a benevolent figure, for it is Changing Woman who gives the people their abundance and who provides the teachings that allow them to live in harmony with all things. In the initiation ceremony of Navajo women, the initiate takes in the power of Changing Woman so that she might learn the values of love, hospitality and generosity and know that she herself is a source of food and harmony.

Changing Woman received her name because she can change at will from a baby to a girl to a young woman to an old woman and then back again. Very much alive today, she is a tremendously nourishing goddess who teaches the wisdom of nature and the cycles of birth and death.

From GODDESS KNOWLEDGE CARDS,
Susan Eleanor Boulet Trust. Text by Michael Babcock.
Published by Pomegranate
Box 6099, Rohnert Park, California 94927

Taking the time to listen and contemplate all the change that has taken place in my lifetime – the impact of that change and how I, like Changing Woman, have changed.

An Artistic Midwife

Ix Chel is the ancient Mayan moon goddess who reigned supreme throught the Yucatan Peninsula, in southern Mexico, and as far south as El Salvador for more than a millennium. She is also called the Queen, Our Mother, the White Lady, and the Goddess of Becoming. Although married to the sun, she is fiercely independent, allowing no one to own her: she remains free to come and go as she chooses. As a fertility goddess, she makes women fruitful and sends fertilizing rains to the earth. She is particularly honored as a patroness of childbirth and a healing goddess of medicine.

Like many moon goddesses, she is the patroness of weaving. Ix Chel, like the waxing and waning moon, is comfortable with all sides of life. Her energy is midwife to our own creative ideas.

From GODDESS KNOWLEDGE CARDS,
Susan Eleanor Boulet Trust. Text by Michael Babcock.

ixchel

As an ancient fertility goddess, Ix-Chel was responsible for sending rain to nourish the crops. When fulfilling that function she was called “Lady Rainbow”. She helped insure fertility by overturning her sacred womb jar so that the waters would flow.

Though sometimes depicted as a goddess of catastrophe (the woman who stands by as the world floods), many of her myths show her in a more benevolent light—as a goddess who refused to become a victim of oppression.

This was a woman who, when faced with adversity, took charge of her life and turned it around!

The small Isla Mujeres (“Island of Women”) was devoted to the worship of Ix-Chel. Comfortable with all phases of life, she was honored as the weaver of the life cycle. She protected the fertility of women and was also the keeper of the souls of the dead.

IX Chel has come to remind me that it is her energy that has helped me name myself artistic midwife and to see how I turned my life around in the face of massive life change.

More on Isla Mujeres History